About Gregory C. Sundra - gcsundra
I'm not sure I'd make it, but here it is.  #100.  This is the Tinkers Creek Gorge Overlook within the Bedford Reservation of the Cleveland Metroparks.  What makes this one personally special for me is that this was, more or less, my front yard as a child.  I often hung out here and collected my thoughts or tried to figure out the world.  I am not sure I was ever successful on that last one, but it is a beautiful place just to hang out, especially for a kid.

An Overflow of the Heart

Photography has been a passion of mine since growing up in the unique world of the Cuyahoga River Valley in northeast Ohio. In my early years I was intrigued by the ability to capture a moment in time, isolating a view of the world as seen through my eyes and interpreted by an inner vision that evolved through my observations of the world in which I lived. I often found myself wandering to explore the wooded hills of the surrounding parklands taking my 110mm film camera to see what I could capture.

I eventually graduated to a 35mm SLR and studied the art of photography for a time as well as the masters who were pioneers in the field. I was inspired by those who simplified complex scenes by accentuating basic graphic elements or isolating what would otherwise be an unnoticed detail. I was drawn by the feelings evoked in the images of greats like Adams, Riis, Hine, Stieglitz, and others. 

Through photography, I learned of the history of America, from the Civil War to the westward push to new lands, to the Great Depression and the years of FDR’s New Deal. I was especially drawn to the wonderfully sensitive work of FSA photographers like Lange, Strand, Bourke-White, and others whose photographs were documentary statements that took me into the lives of people whom I had never met yet somehow felt emotionally connected to. Through the work of these great photographers I began to recognize the power of the captured image expressing one’s perspective of a world that was at times stunningly beautiful and at times blatantly cruel. I saw photography as an interpretive medium capable of communicating deep from the creative heart of one who uniquely sees to the receptive heart of one who uniquely connects and responds.

Shortly after my kids were born, I put photography on the shelf to focus on the new responsibilities of fatherhood. I pulled my camera out from time to time to document their growth and special events but largely shot very little for more than a decade. As time went by, I found myself wanting, even needing to pick up the camera again - to provide an outlet for an inner vision that had been bottled up a decade earlier. 

When I use my camera to engage the world I experience feelings that seem to flow from the core of my being. As I seek to capture within the frame of my camera’s sensor a unique and personal moment in time, I discover a connection with my Creator that affirms part of my life's purpose, that is, to worship Him. My eyes reflect God’s heart in me, and at the same time, it is a personal and unique expression of worship back to Him.

Here on these pages, I hope you enjoy and connect with this vision. Perhaps the images here will touch you in a place that speaks afresh of the incredible wonder of the Creator. My hope is that when you are finished you might see your world and even your life just a little differently. 

God bless you and thanks for visiting.

-greg
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I fell in love with photography while growing up in the Cuyahoga River Valley in northeast Ohio. In my early years I was intrigued by the ability to capture a moment in time, isolating a view of the world as seen through my eyes and interpreted by an inner vision that evolved through my observations of the world in which I lived. I often found myself wandering to explore the wooded hills of the surrounding parkland taking my 110mm film camera to see what I could capture. 


I eventually graduated to a 35mm SLR and studied the art of photography for a time as well as the masters who were pioneers in the field. I was inspired by those who simplified complex scenes and ideas by accentuating basic graphic elements or isolating what would otherwise be an unnoticed detail. I was drawn by the feelings evoked in the images of greats like Adams, Riis, Hine, Stieglitz, Evans, and others who used the medium to communicate about a momentary time and place. 

Through photography, I learned of the history of America, from the Civil War to the westward push to new lands, to the Great Depression and the years of FDR’s New Deal. I was especially drawn to the wonderfully sensitive work of FSA photographers like Lange, Strand, Bourke-White, and others whose photographs were documentary statements that took me into the lives of people whom I had never met yet somehow felt emotionally connected to. Through the work of these great photographers I began to recognize the power of the captured image expressing one’s perspective of a world that was at times stunningly beautiful and at times blatantly cruel. I saw photography as an interpretive medium capable of communicating deep from the creative heart of one who uniquely sees to the receptive heart of one who uniquely connects and responds.

Shortly after my kids were born, I put photography on the shelf to focus on the new responsibilities of fatherhood. I pulled my camera out from time to time to document their growth and special events but largely shot very little for more than a decade. As time went by, I found myself wanting, even needing to pick up the camera again - to provide an outlet for an inner voice that had in some ways been bottled up a decade earlier.

When I use my camera to engage the world I experience feelings that seem to flow from the core of my being. As I seek to capture within the frame of my camera’s sensor a unique and personal moment in time, I discover a connection with my Creator that affirms part of my life's purpose, that is, to worship Him. My eyes reflect God’s heart in me, and at the same time, it is a personal and unique expression of worship back to Him.

The Bible says that out of the overflow of the heart, the mouth speaks. Similarly, my photographs are born of the overflow of a heart’s voice reflecting this one man’s journey.

Here on these pages, I hope you enjoy and connect with this vision. Perhaps the images here will touch you in a place that speaks afresh of the incredible wonder of the Creator. My hope is that when you are finished you might see your world and your journey through its time and space just a little differently.

May God bless you, and thanks for visiting. 

-greg

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